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Replay J1939 Logged Field Data to a Simulation

This example shows how to replay J1939 data from a BLF-file acquired from a J1939 system in a real-world application, such as a vehicle running in the field. The Simulink model runs a simple horsepower estimator algorithm to trigger a fault that might have occurred in the field. The example takes you through a part of the model-based workflow using field data to recreate a fault that was present in the Simulink algorithm before it was deployed onto an ECU, and can be extended to test any algorithm model to debug faults.

J1939 is a higher-layer protocol that uses the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus technology as a physical layer. Since CAN is the basis of data transfer in a J1939 system, the tool used in the field by default logs J1939 data as CAN frames. This example performs data replay of the originally logged CAN frames over a CAN bus from MATLAB and receives in a Simulink model using the J1939 Network Configuration, J1939 Node Configuration, J1939 CAN Transport Layer, and J1939 Receive blocks.

The BLF-file used in this example was generated from Vector CANoe using the "System Configuration (J1939)" sample configuration, and modified using MATLAB and Vehicle Network Toolbox. This example also uses the J1939 DBC-file PowerTrain_J1939.dbc, provided with the Vector sample configuration. Vehicle Network Toolbox provides J1939 Simulink blocks for receiving and transmitting parameter groups (PG) via Simulink models over CAN. The example uses MathWorks virtual CAN channels connected in a loopback configuration.

Read the BLF-File Data

Using the blfread function, read the data from channel 1 of the BLF-file that was acquired in the field.

canData = blfread("LoggingBLF_J1939Replay.blf",1)
canData=15000×8 timetable
        Time           ID        Extended       Name                      Data                    Length      Signals       Error    Remote
    ____________    _________    ________    __________    ___________________________________    ______    ____________    _____    ______

    0.000568 sec    418316032     true       {0×0 char}    {[          76 52 169 232 0 0 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.001128 sec    418316035     true       {0×0 char}    {[          78 52 169 232 0 3 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.001688 sec    418316043     true       {0×0 char}    {[          75 52 169 232 0 9 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.002244 sec    418316055     true       {0×0 char}    {[         77 52 169 232 0 19 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.002796 sec    418316083     true       {0×0 char}    {[         79 52 169 232 0 38 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.003364 sec    418316262     true       {0×0 char}    {[      105 52 169 232 0 131 0 16]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.003932 sec    418316262     true       {0×0 char}    {[      105 52 169 232 0 131 0 16]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25158 sec     201326595     true       {0×0 char}    {[252 255 255 255 248 255 255 255]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25216 sec     201326603     true       {0×0 char}    {[252 255 255 255 248 255 255 255]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25272 sec     217055747     true       {0×0 char}    {[        192 0 0 250 240 240 7 3]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.2533 sec      217056000     true       {0×0 char}    {[            1 0 0 0 0 252 0 255]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25386 sec     217056256     true       {0×0 char}    {[        240 0 125 208 7 0 241 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25444 sec     418382091     true       {0×0 char}    {[               0 0 0 0 0 1 11 3]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25501 sec     418383107     true       {0×0 char}    {[            125 0 0 125 0 0 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.2556 sec      418384139     true       {0×0 char}    {[                0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
    0.25618 sec     419283979     true       {0×0 char}    {[      3 0 0 255 255 255 255 255]}      8       {0×0 struct}    false    false 
      ⋮

This data contains one PG of interest for this example called EEC1_EMS. The PG contains data coming from the Engine Electronic Controller module. This example manipulates the dataset from the BLF-file to deliberately trigger a failure mode for demonstration purposes. The Simulink model recreates this failure using the modified dataset.

Open the Simulink Model

Open the Simulink model that contains your algorithm. The model contained in this example uses a basic J1939 network setup. For more details on this setup and the J1939 blocks, see the example Get Started with J1939 Communication in Simulink.

open demoVNTSL_J1939ReplayExample

Model Overview

The example model is configured to perform a receive operation for the EEC1_EMS PG over the MathWorks virtual device 1 channel 1.

  • The J1939 Network Configuration block is configured with the database Powertrain_J1939.dbc.

  • The J1939 CAN Transport Layer block sets the Device to MathWorks virtual channel 1. The transport layer is configured to transfer J1939 messages over CAN via the specified virtual channel.

  • The J1939 Receive block receives the messages transmitted over the network. The J1939 Receive is configured to receive the EEC1_EMS PG and pass on the required inputs (Actual Engine Percentage Torque (%) and Engine Speed (RPM)) to the Horsepower Estimator Algorithm. It is also configured to pass the Engine Demanded Percent Torque (%) to a relational operator block. The rest of the outputs have been terminated for simplicity.

Horsepower Estimator Algorithm

The Horsepower Estimator Algorithm is a simple calculation which takes the actual engine torque percentage and speed values and computes engine horsepower from them.

Relational Operators

There are three relational operator blocks in the model:

  • Relational Operator 1 compares the value of computed horsepower to zero and outputs a Boolean.

  • Relational Operator 2 compares the value of engine demanded torque percentage to zero and outputs a Boolean.

  • Relational Operator 3 compares the value of the outputs from Relational Operators 1 and 2 and outputs a Boolean to trigger the state of the Fault Indicator lamp.

Vehicle Dashboard

The Vehicle Dashboard consists of the speed dial showing the engine RPM, the two gauges showing the computed value of horsepower and the engine percent demanded torque, and the Fault Indicator lamp.

Create the Channel for Replay

Create the CAN channel to replay the messages using the canChannel function.

replayChannel = canChannel("MathWorks","Virtual 1",2);

Set Model Parameters and Start the Simulation

Assign the simulation time and start the simulation.

set_param("demoVNTSL_J1939ReplayExample","StopTime","inf");
set_param("demoVNTSL_J1939ReplayExample","SimulationCommand","start");

Pause until the simulation is fully started.

while strcmp(get_param("demoVNTSL_J1939ReplayExample","SimulationStatus"),"stopped")
end

Start the CAN Channel and Replay the Data

Start the MATLAB CAN channel.

start(replayChannel);
pause(2);

Replay the data acquired from the BLF-file. The replay operation runs for approximately 45 seconds.

replay(replayChannel,canData);

Simulation Overview

During the running of this example, observe the Simulink model. There will be changes in value in the gauges and the red-green light transition of the Fault Indicator lamp in the Vehicle Dashboard section.

The J1939 Receive block receives the EEC1_EMS PG from MATLAB, decodes the signals of interest, and passes them to the Horsepower Estimator Algorithm. After the horsepower is computed, Relational Operator 1 compares its values to zero to determine the direction. The J1939 Receive block also passes the Engine Demanded Percent Torque to Relational Operator 2. Relational Operator 2 compares its values to zero to determine the direction.

The output is a Boolean 1 if the value is greater than or equal to zero, or 0 if it is less than zero (negative).

Relational Operator 3 takes the outputs of the earlier two relational operators and equates them. If the value for both the blocks is 0 or 1, i.e., positive horsepower and positive torque (1), or negative horsepower and negative torque (0), it provides an output of 1, which in turn triggers the green light of the Fault Indicator lamp. However, if the value for either of the earlier relational operator blocks is opposite to the other one, i.e., positive horsepower (1) and negative torque (0), or negative horsepower (0) and positive torque (1), it provides an output of 0, which in turn triggers the red light of the Fault Indicator lamp. These observations are helpful in determining whether the algorithm is faulty based on the field data, and you can further analyze the algorithm.

Stop the CAN Channel

stop(replayChannel);

Stop the Simulation

set_param("demoVNTSL_J1939ReplayExample","SimulationCommand","stop");