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camheight

Set or query height of camera for geographic globe

Description

Set Height and Mode

example

camheight(g,height) sets the ellipsoidal height of the camera for the specified geographic globe.

camheight(g,'auto') sets the camera height to automatic mode, enabling the geographic globe to determine the height of the camera based on the plotted data. The mode defaults to automatic when you create a geographic globe. If you change the camera height using your mouse, then the mode switches to automatic.

example

camheight(g,'manual') sets the camera height to manual mode, specifying that the geographic globe preserve the height of the camera when the plotted data changes. If you change the camera height using the camheight function, then the mode switches to manual.

Query Height

example

heightOut = camheight(g) returns the ellipsoidal height of the camera.

heightOut = camheight(___) sets the height or mode and then returns the ellipsoidal height of the camera. You can return the camera height using any combination of input arguments from the previous syntaxes.

Examples

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Create a geographic globe. Specify the latitude and longitude of the Eiffel Tower, and specify a height that is 700 meters above the WGS84 reference ellipsoid. Then, move the camera using the campos function.

uif = uifigure;
g = geoglobe(uif);

lat = 48.8584;
lon = 2.2945;
h = 700;
campos(g,lat,lon,h)

Change only the height of the camera by using the camheight function. Increase the camera height to 1500 meters above the WGS84 reference ellipsoid.

camheight(g,1500)

Create a geographic globe. Position the camera above Mount Washington by specifying a latitude, longitude, and ellipsoidal height.

uif = uifigure;
g = geoglobe(uif);

height0 = 2500;
campos(g,44.2706,-71.3025,height0)

Animate the view by incrementally changing the camera height. As the camera height increases, the view zooms out.

for height = 2500:50:5000
    camheight(g,height)
    drawnow
end

Get the height of the camera. Use this information to control the view of a different geographic globe or to automate navigation.

Create a geographic globe. Zoom in on an area around Spain using your mouse or gestures.

uif = uifigure;
g = geoglobe(uif);

Satellite view of Spain

Query the height of the camera and assign it to a variable.

outHeight = camheight(g)
outHeight =

   1.8803e+06

Use this value to control the camera height for a different geographic globe. For example, create a new geographic globe and programmatically set the camera height.

uif2 = uifigure;
g2 = geoglobe(uif2);
camheight(g2,outHeight)

Preserve the position and the heading, pitch, and roll angles of the camera by setting the camera modes to manual. If you do not set the camera modes to manual, then the camera view resets when you plot new data.

Import a sample route along roads in Massachusetts using the gpxread function. Create a geographic globe with a road map and no terrain data. Preserve the basemap and terrain settings by using the hold function. Then, navigate to an area near Eastern Massachusetts using your mouse.

track = gpxread('sample_tracks.gpx','Index',2);
lat = track.Latitude;
lon = track.Longitude;
height = track.Elevation;

uif = uifigure;
g = geoglobe(uif,'Basemap','streets','Terrain','none');
hold(g,'on')

Map of an area around Eastern Massachusetts with labeled cities and roads

Set the camera modes to manual and plot the data. Note that the camera position does not change.

campos(g,'manual')
camheight(g,'manual')
camheading(g,'manual')
campitch(g,'manual')
camroll(g,'manual')
geoplot3(g,lat,lon,height,'LineWidth',3)

The same map with a blue line plotted along several roads

The strategies you use to programmatically zoom in and out of GeographicGlobe and GeographicAxes objects are different. For GeographicGlobe objects, you specify a camera height using the camheight function. For GeographicAxes objects, you specify a zoom level using the ZoomLevel property or specify latitude and longitude limits using the geolimits function. To create GeographicGlobe and GeographicAxes objects with similar map scales, approximate camera height and zoom level using the heightToZoomLevel and zoomLevelToHeight local functions (defined here).

You can verify the behavior of the zoomLevelToHeight local function by displaying GeographicAxes and GeographicGlobe objects using comparable magnification levels.

Specify the latitude and longitude of the Sydney Opera House. Create geographic axes with a basemap, map center, and zoom level that allows you to clearly see the building.

lat = -33.8572;
lon = 151.2150;
z = 17;
gx = geoaxes('Basemap','satellite','MapCenter',[lat lon],'ZoomLevel',z);

Create a geographic globe. Position the camera above the Sydney Opera House using the campos function.

uif = uifigure;
g = geoglobe(uif);
campos(g,lat,lon)

Calculate an approximate camera height from the zoom level using the zoomLevelToHeight local function. Then, set the camera height using the camheight function. Note that the geographic axes and geographic globe displays are comparable.

h = zoomLevelToHeight(z,lat);
camheight(g,h)

To verify the behavior of the heightToZoomLevel function, calculate an approximate zoom level from the camera height.

z2 = heightToZoomLevel(h,lat)
z2 = 17

Note that z and z2 are equal.

This code defines a local function called zoomLevelToHeight that approximates the camera height h for a GeographicGlobe object using the zoom level z and map center latitude lat of a GeographicAxes object.

function h = zoomLevelToHeight(z,lat)
    earthCircumference = 2*pi*6378137;
    h = (earthCircumference*cosd(lat)) / 2^(z-1);
end

This code defines a local function called heightToZoomLevel that approximates the zoom level z for a GeographicAxes object using the camera height h and latitude lat of a GeographicGlobe object.

function z = heightToZoomLevel(h,lat)
    earthCircumference = 2*pi*6378137;
    z = log2((earthCircumference*cosd(lat)) / h) + 1;
    z = max(0,z);
    z = min(19,z);
end

Input Arguments

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Geographic globe, specified as a GeographicGlobe object.[1]

Ellipsoidal height of the camera, specified as a numeric scalar in meters. Geographic globe objects use the WGS84 reference ellipsoid. For more information about ellipsoidal height, see Find Ellipsoidal Height from Orthometric Height.

If you specify the height so that the camera is level with or below the terrain, then the camheight function sets the height to a value one meter above the terrain.

Introduced in R2020b

[1] Alignment of boundaries and region labels are a presentation of the feature provided by the data vendors and do not imply endorsement by MathWorks®.